Month: August 2009

Top firms’ pension funds plummet

The BBC today reported that the top 100 UK firms have a combined shortfall on their Final Salary pension funds of £96Billion (yes Billion!). This represents a deterioration from a combined deficit of £41Billion at the same time last year. Most of the fall in value has been attributed to falls in share prices but changes in the assumptions, which are used to determine the level of funding needed to meet promised benefits, have also had a significant bearing. In some cases the value of the underfunding actually exceeds the value of the company.

The BBC article goes on to suggest that this will lead to more schemes being closed to new members. Of the top 100 companies, only three still offer Final Salary Pensions to new members. If you are interested, they are Cadbury, Diageo and Tesco.

What the article does not mention is that there are many more Final Salary pensions, mostly held on behalf of small to medium sized employers (and most people in Britain work for one of these rather than a top 100 firm). These will also be suffering from substantial deficits. The difference between a lot of the smaller firms and the top 100 firms is that they are often privately owned and therefore do not have the same access to additional capital as companies that are quoted on the Stock Exchange.

The issue with the smaller companies, who will be feeling the pinch every bit as badly at the moment is that, they are more likely to go bust and therefore be unable to make up the under-funding on their pension funds. Where this occurs the benefits will come under the auspices of the Pension Protection Fund, about which I have blogged before Protection for Final Salary Scheme Benefits could be under threat.

To cut a long story short, the PPF provides limited protection which, over time, can fall substantially short of what was originally promised. Furthermore, due to potential difficulties with funding the protection (based on levies charges to the remaining schemes which are already in financial difficulties) PPF benefits could need to be reduced in future.

So what should you do if you have final salary benefits either with your current or a previous employer? Well, for certain you should obtain details of the Transfer Value and the benefits to which you are entitled. These should be reviewed on your behalf by a pensions specialist (who will also take a whole range of other factors into account such as the state of funding of the scheme and the financial health of the sponsoring employer, amongst others). From this you will be able to form a realistic assessment of the safety of your benefits and whether you ought to move them to an arrangement that provides you with greater personal control.

If you are a financial adviser reading this article and you are not qualified to provide Pension Transfer Advice, consider referring your clients to an adviser who will work with you to ensure that your client’s needs are met in this regard.