Month: November 2014

Temporary Transfer Relaxation for pensions carrying higher tax free cash or early retirement age

Formerly pension scheme members with schemes carrying a higher entitlement to tax free cash or an early retirement age would loose these when transferring to a new plan, unless at least one other member of the same scheme transferred with them at the same time, to the same scheme. For schemes without any other members, such as section 32 plans, one person EPPs or assigned policies, this meant that the option to preserve protections when transferring to personal pensions was not available.

However, solo transfers are now permissible, as long as the following criteria are met:

• The transfer must fully extinguish all rights within the current plan
• The transfer must be made in a single transaction
• The transfer must be completed before 6 April 2015
• The new plan must be fully crystallised (including any other rights held within the new plan) before 6 October 2015
• Benefits are payable from age 55 (unless a protected retirement age is available).

As the transfer must be completed before 6 April, the investor would also have the choice to set up a capped drawdown arrangement, should they wish to retain the higher annual allowance. It should also be noted that any GMP benefits will be lost on transfer.

So what does this mean?

Pension scheme members who have held off transferring their benefits due to a potential loss of tax free cash or because they will loose the ability to retire early may now make an individual transfer to a new plan without loosing the enhanced benefits.

Who does this affect?

• Sports people and members of professions who were previously entitled to early retirement ages
• Members of occupational defined contribution pension schemes such as Executive Pensions, Small Self Administered Schemes (SSAS), Contracted Out and Contracted In Money Purchase Schemes (COMPs and CIMPS)
• Those who have transferred their benefits to a Section 32 Buy-Out

This is a complex area and advice from a pensions specialist should always be taken before implementing any transactions.

The press was full of ‘pension bank account’ stories in October. Will it be that simple?

The Taxation of Pensions Bill, which will put most of the Budget 2014 pension changes into law, was published in mid-October. It contained few surprises, not least because it had been issued in draft in August, along with detailed explanatory notes. Nevertheless, the Treasury pumped out a press release and the media duly splashed the (old) news.

The emphasis in the press coverage was, to quote the Treasury release “Under the new tax rules, individuals will have the flexibility of taking a series of lump sums from their pension fund, with 25% of each payment tax free and 75% taxed at their marginal rate, without having to enter into a drawdown policy.” It was this reform which prompted the talk of using pensions as bank accounts. However, things may not be quite that simple in practice:

• The new rules do not apply to final salary pension schemes, which may only provide a scheme pension and a pension commencement lump sum.

• It is already possible to make this type of 25% tax free/75% taxable withdrawal under the flexible drawdown provisions introduced in 2011. This has not proved very popular.

• The new rules are meant to come into effect on 6 April 2015, but they are not mandatory, so some pension providers may choose not to offer them. It seems likely that many occupational money purchase schemes will avoid any changes, as they were never designed to make payments out – that was the job of the annuity provider. Similarly many insurance companies may not be willing to offer flexibility on older generations of pension plan – just as some do not currently offer drawdown.

• The short timescale has been criticised by the pensions industry. Systems and administrative changes can only be finalised once the Bill has become law and that will be perilously close to April, making it difficult for providers to bring in the changes from day one.

• If you are able to take a large lump from your pension, the tax consequences could be most unwelcome. For example, drawing out £100,000 would mean adding £75,000 to your taxable income – enough to guarantee you pay at least some higher rate tax, regardless of your income, and quite possibly sufficient to mean the loss of all or part of your personal allowance. No wonder the Treasury expects to increase tax revenue as a result of the reforms.

• Ironically another of the pension reforms, reducing the tax on lump sum death benefits, could mean you are best advised to leave your pension untouched and draw monies from elsewhere.

The new pension tax regime will present many opportunities and pitfalls, not all of which are immediately apparent. Do make sure you ask for our advice before taking any action.

The value of tax reliefs depends on your individual circumstances. Tax laws can change. The Financial Conduct Authority does not regulate tax advice. The value of investments can go down as well as up and you may not get back the full amount you invested. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance.