The Chancellor’s Autumn Budget 2017

The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP

Following a turbulent few months across The Palace of Westminster, with a call for more spending and a more aggressive approach to growing the economy, the Chancellor’s budget was largely seen as a business as usual approach, albeit within the ever-present shadow of Brexit.

So now that Philip Hammond has had his day in Parliament, let’s see what kind of impact it’s going to have on yours.

Well firstly, there were no significant announcements regarding tax or pension changes. Nor was there anything that set the markets alight, or sent them into free-fall. In fact this market apathy was manifested in the non-movement of the FTSE 100, Benchmark 10 year Government bond or guilt and with the pound largely static during the Chancellors hour-long delivery.

What the Budget might mean for you

INCOME TAX

Your personal income tax allowance is set to rise to £11,850 for the fiscal year 2018-19 throughout the UK apart from Scotland. As Scotland will set its own personal tax threshold, should it choose to, in the Scottish budget due on 14 December.

The higher rate of income tax in the UK will rise to £46,350 for the fiscal year of 2018-19. Again with the exception of Scotland, who may address this in their impending budget.

STAMP DUTY

First time buys will not have to pay Stamp Duty on properties up to a value of £300,000, which would also see those buying properties up to £500,000 paying no stamp duty on the first £300,000. A move that should benefit 95% of first time buyers

PENSIONS

The pensions lifetime allowance will rise in line with the consumer price index to £1.03Million. One highlight for pensions is that there will be no changes in the pensions funding limits, with the annual allowance remaining at £40,000 and not tapered until adjusted income exceeds £150,000.

ISA’s

The Junior ISA limit is set to rise to £4,260. Whilst the overall ISA limit will stay at £20,000 of which £4,000 can be paid into a LISA (for those eligible).

CAPITAL GAINS TAX

There will be a £400 increase in the capital gains tax allowance, seeing the threshold rise to £11,700.

INHERITANCE TAX

The nil band rate for inheritance tax will remain at £325,000 until April 2021, with the residence nil rate band increasing from £100,000 to £125,000. Which means that, in the future, couples can leave assets up to £900,000 to future generations free of inheritance tax liability.

TRUST

Although no specific details were announced, there is a planned consultation, to be published in 2018, which will consider the simplification and fairness of trust taxation.

STOCKS

The UK Stock Market was largely indifferent to the Chancellors speech. In fact, when he stood up to speak the FTSE100 was trading at 7,448 and when he sat down an hour later, it was largely unchanged.

The real movement in the market came about through the changes in Stamp Duty. With large house builders witnessing their shares drop between 1% and 3%. Possibly reflecting some disappointment in the detail of the chancellors £44 Billion Housing Package, along with the lack of an extension to the popular Help to Buy scheme, compounded with an investigation into the speed at which permitted land banks see the building of new homes taking place.

In true Stock Market traditions, where the tide goes out for one group, in it comes for another.
With the increase in the Stamp Duty it is widely believed that we will see a reinvigoration of the housing market, as well as the driving up of house prices. All this leads to higher profits for Estate Agents and, as a consequence of that, national chains saw an increase in the value of their share price.

CURRENCY MARKETS

The downgrade in the UK’s GDP growth forecast for the next three to four years, along with the rest of the budget, went through without any real reaction from the currency markets. With Sterling ending the budget in much the same place as it started against the Euro and Dollar.

2017 BUDGET SUMMARY

All in all, the Chancellor delivered a steady budget, without any radical changes to the landscape. As always, if you have any questions regarding a specific area of the budget, or your own personal circumstances, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch, where we will be happy to help you in any way.

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