Category: EPP

Business owners to profit from pension flexibility

Business owners to profit from pension flexibility
Business owners looking to extract surplus profits from their business will be looking forward to April’s new pension income flexibility. Not only will pension funding remain the most tax efficient way to extract profits, but those funds will also become far more accessible than ever before.

Allowable contributions have the double benefit of reducing the profits subject to corporation tax, without incurring an employer National Insurance liability. Extraction by salary or bonus will reduce profits before tax, but will not side step NI.

The only previous downside for business owners was that pension funds were not as readily accessible as cash. But all that will change from April if the owner of the business is over age 55. This could lead to business owners seeking advice on how to maximise their contributions.

How much can be paid?
Potentially if someone has not paid anything into their pension for some time they can pay up to £230,000 now. This would be done in two stages. First, by using carry-forward from the 3 previous tax years. This amounts to £150,000 using allowances from 2013/14, 2012/13 & 2011/12. Plus, in order to carry-forward they would also have to pay the maximum £40,000 for the current year. Potentially they may also be able to pay a further £40,000 towards next year’s allowance now if their current input period ends in the 2015/16 tax year.

Unlike paying pension contributions personally, company contributions are not limited by the business owner’s earned income. Instead, the company just has to be able demonstrate that the contributions were ‘wholly and exclusively for the purpose of trade’. However, the company would typically need to have enough profits in the accounting year to get the full benefit of corporation tax relief.

The financial dangers of hoarding cash
There may also be a spin off benefit of paying surplus profits to a pension instead of capitalising it:

Inheritance tax
Shares in unquoted trading companies normally attract IHT business property relief (BPR). But cash built up in the company bank account or investments held within the company could be regarded as an ‘excepted asset’ and not qualify for BPR. To qualify for relief; cash has to have been used in the business in the past two years or earmarked for a specific future business purpose. Clients should always obtain professional advice to get clarity on their particular situation.

With many companies still stockpiling cash following the credit crunch, some business owners could be unwittingly storing up an IHT charge. Amounts over and above their company’s usual working capital could be included within their estate.

Paying into their pension could help ease this. There is typically no IHT payable on pension death benefits provided the contributions weren’t made when they were in ill health. Extracting the cash from the business in the form of a pension contribution could result in an immediate reduction in the business owner’s estate.

Capital Gains Tax
Holding excess cash in the business could cause similar issues when shares in the company are sold. Entrepreneurs’ relief is valuable to business owners as it can reduce the rate of CGT payable on the disposal of qualifying shareholdings to just 10%. To qualify the shares must be in a trading a company. A trading company for this purpose is one which does not include substantial non-trading activities.

While cash reserves are not looked at in isolation, holding substantial cash and other investments could contribute to a company losing its ‘trading’ status. And unlike BPR, entrepreneurs relief is all or nothing. If cash and investments trigger a loss in relief it affects the full value of the business disposed of; not just the non-trading assets.

CGT will not be an issue if they intend to pass their shares on death to other family members. But it could have huge implications for business owners approaching retirement and planning to sell their business as part of their exit strategy. Extracting surplus cash through pension planning to ensure entrepreneurs’ relief is secured on sale of the business will be an important consideration.

The cost of delay
Each year clients delay, the maximum amount they can pay using carry-forward will diminish. The annual allowance cut from £50,000 to £40,000 in 2014/15 will reduce the amount that can be carried forward by £10,000 for each of the next 3 years. By 2017/18 the maximum carry-forward will have dropped from £190k to £160k.

What difference could this make to your retirement pot? Well, if your planned retirement was in 10 years, a net annual growth rate of 4% after charges on £190k would provide a pot of over £281K. By contrast, waiting three years and investing £160k, the accumulated pot would be £210k – almost £71k less.

Time to act
With the main rate of corporation tax set to fall by 1% from 1 April it makes sense to bring forward pension funding to maximise relief. Paying contributions in the current accounting period will see a reduction in the profits chargeable at a higher rate of corporation tax.

All in all, there are many compelling reasons to use pensions to extract profits which aren’t required for future business use. And the longer they leave it the greater the danger of missing out on valuable reliefs.

ISA inheritability makes ‘allowance’ for your spouse

Details have begun to emerge on how the new inheritable ISA rules will operate. And the good news is that it will be achieved by an increased ISA allowance for the surviving spouse rather than the actual ISA assets themselves. This means clients won’t have to revisit their wills.

How the rules will work.

If an ISA holder dies after 3 December, their spouse or civil partner will be allowed to invest an amount equivalent to the deceased’s ISA into their own ISA via an additional allowance. This is in addition to their normal annual ISA limit for the tax year and will be claimable from 6 April 2015. This means the surviving spouse can continue to enjoy tax free investment returns on savings equal to the deceased ISA fund. But it doesn’t have to be the same assets which came from the deceased’s ISA which are paid into their spouses new or existing ISA. The surviving spouse can make contributions up to their increased allowance from any assets.

What it means for estate planning

By not linking the transferability to the actual ISA assets, it provides greater flexibility and doesn’t have an adverse impact on estate planning that your client may have already put in place. For example, had it been the ISA itself which had to pass to the spouse to benefit from the continued tax privileged status, it could have meant many thousands of ISA holders having to amend their existing Wills. Where the spouse was not the intended beneficiary under the Will or where assets would have been held on trust for the spouse – a common scenario – the spouse would miss out on the tax savings on offer. Instead it’s the allowance which is inherited, not the asset. This means that, even in the scenarios described above, the spouse can benefit by paying her own assets into her ISA and claiming the higher allowance. And the deceased’s assets can be distributed in accordance with their wishes, as set out in their Will.

The tax implications

The tax benefits of an ISA are well documented. Funds remain free of income tax and capital gains when held within the ISA wrapper. And it’s the continuity of this tax free growth for the surviving spouse where the new benefit lies. It’s an opportunity to keep savings in a tax free environment. But the new rules don’t provide any additional inheritance tax benefits. The rules just entitle the survivor to an increased ISA allowance for a limited period after death. The actual ISA assets will be distributed in line with the terms of the Will (or the intestacy rules) and remain within the estate for IHT. Where they pass to the spouse or civil partner, they’ll be covered by the spousal exemption. Even then, ultimately the combined ISA funds may be subject to 40% IHT on the second death.

With ISA rules and pension rules getting ever closer, it may be worth some clients even considering whether to take up their increased ISA allowance if the same amount could be paid into their SIPP. This would achieve the same tax free investment returns as the ISA and the same access for client’s over 55. But the benefit would be that the SIPP will be free of IHT and potentially tax free in the hands of the beneficiaries if death is before 75.

What’s next?

The new allowance will be available from 6 April 2015 for deaths on or after 3 December. Draft legislation is expected before the end of the year and the final position will become clear after a short period of consultation. The new inherited allowance will complement the new pension death rules – a welcome addition to the whole new world of tax planning opportunities for advisers and their clients from next April.

Temporary Transfer Relaxation for pensions carrying higher tax free cash or early retirement age

Formerly pension scheme members with schemes carrying a higher entitlement to tax free cash or an early retirement age would loose these when transferring to a new plan, unless at least one other member of the same scheme transferred with them at the same time, to the same scheme. For schemes without any other members, such as section 32 plans, one person EPPs or assigned policies, this meant that the option to preserve protections when transferring to personal pensions was not available.

However, solo transfers are now permissible, as long as the following criteria are met:

• The transfer must fully extinguish all rights within the current plan
• The transfer must be made in a single transaction
• The transfer must be completed before 6 April 2015
• The new plan must be fully crystallised (including any other rights held within the new plan) before 6 October 2015
• Benefits are payable from age 55 (unless a protected retirement age is available).

As the transfer must be completed before 6 April, the investor would also have the choice to set up a capped drawdown arrangement, should they wish to retain the higher annual allowance. It should also be noted that any GMP benefits will be lost on transfer.

So what does this mean?

Pension scheme members who have held off transferring their benefits due to a potential loss of tax free cash or because they will loose the ability to retire early may now make an individual transfer to a new plan without loosing the enhanced benefits.

Who does this affect?

• Sports people and members of professions who were previously entitled to early retirement ages
• Members of occupational defined contribution pension schemes such as Executive Pensions, Small Self Administered Schemes (SSAS), Contracted Out and Contracted In Money Purchase Schemes (COMPs and CIMPS)
• Those who have transferred their benefits to a Section 32 Buy-Out

This is a complex area and advice from a pensions specialist should always be taken before implementing any transactions.